Women S Rights To Vote Essays

Women's Right to Vote
Inspiring Essay on Women's Suffrage Movement

"By the end of the night, they were barely alive. They hurled Dora Lewis into a dark cell, smashed her head against an iron bed and knocked her out cold. Her cellmate, Alice Cosu, thought Lewis was dead. She suffered a heart attack. Additional affidavits describe the guards dragging, beating, choking, slamming, pinching, and kicking the women. Thus unfolded the 'Night of Terror' on Nov. 15, 1917."
  ~~  From powerful essay on prison treatment of suffragettes fighting for women's right to vote

Dear friends,

The below message is a powerful and inspiring reminder of how far we have come. 200 years ago, slavery was the order of the day. Just 100 years ago women were not allowed to vote. Read this shocking tale of what some women in the United States had to go through to get the right to vote, and maybe you will be inspired to deepen your commitment in this modern day to help build a brighter future for us and for our children.

With very best wishes for a transformed world,
Fred Burks for PEERS and WantToKnow.info

How Women Got the Right to Vote

This is the story of our mothers and grandmothers who lived only 100 years ago.

Remember, it was not until 1920 that women were granted the right to go to the polls and vote.

In the spring of 1917, members of the National Woman's Party (NWP) began picketing the White House and the Capitol as part of a campaign for a constitutional amendment guaranteeing universal suffrage. By mid-June, NWP leader Alice Paul had been warned by the chief of police that further demonstrations would lead to arrests. In the following months, many were arrested. Some were tried and sentenced to sixty days in Occoquan Workhouse in suburban Virginia. These women were innocent and defenseless, but they were jailed nonetheless for picketing the White House and carrying signs asking for the right to vote.

Paddy wagon detains women picketers

Lucy Burns beaten and chained

One fateful November night while still in jail, many of these brave women were subjected to the wrath of the male institution. Forty prison guards wielding clubs and their warden's blessing went on a rampage against the 33 women wrongly convicted of 'obstructing sidewalk traffic.' And by the end of the night, they were barely alive. They beat Lucy Burns, chained her hands to the cell bars above her head and left her hanging for the night, bleeding and gasping for air.

They hurled Dora Lewis into a dark cell, smashed her head against an iron bed and knocked her out cold. Her cellmate, Alice Cosu, thought Lewis was dead. She suffered a heart attack. Additional affidavits describe the guards dragging, beating, choking, slamming, pinching, and kicking the women. Thus unfolded the 'Night of Terror' on Nov. 15, 1917, when the warden at the Occoquan Workhouse in Virginia ordered his guards to teach a lesson to the suffragists imprisoned there because they dared to picket Woodrow Wilson's White House for the right to vote.

Dora Lewis knocked out

Alice Paul force fed

For weeks, the women's only water came from an open pail. Their food – if you can call it that – was infested with terrible vermin. When picket leader Alice Paul embarked on a hunger strike, they tied her to a chair, forced a tube down her throat and poured liquid into her until she vomited. She was tortured like this for weeks until word was smuggled out to the press.


So, refresh my memory. Some women won't vote because – why, exactly? We have carpool duties? We have to get to work? Our vote doesn't matter? It's raining?

Last week, a friend of mine went to a sparsely attended screening of HBO's new movie ‘Iron Jawed Angels.' It is a graphic depiction of the battle these women waged so that I could pull the curtain at the polling booth and have my say. I am ashamed to say I needed the reminder.

My friend Wendy, who is my age and studied women's history, saw the HBO movie, too. When she stopped by my desk to talk about it, she looked angry. She was angry – with herself. 'One thought kept coming back to me as I watched that movie,' she said. 'What would those women think of the way I use, or don't use, my right to vote? All of us take it for granted now, not just younger women, but those of us who seek to learn.' The right to vote, she said, had become valuable to her 'all over again.'

Pauline Adams in prison garb she wore while serving a sixty-day sentence.


HBO released the movie on video and DVD. I wish all history, social studies and government teachers would include this movie in their curriculum. I want it shown anywhere women gather. I realize this isn't our usual idea of socializing, but we are not voting in the numbers that we should be, and I think a little shock therapy is in order.

It is jarring in this stirring film to watch President Wilson and his cronies try to persuade a psychiatrist to declare Alice Paul insane, so that she could be permanently institutionalized. And it is inspiring to watch the doctor refuse. Alice Paul was strong, he said, and brave. That didn't make her crazy. The doctor admonished the men: 'Courage in women is often mistaken for insanity.'

Conferring over ratification of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution at NWP headquarters, Jackson Place, Washington, D.C.
L-R Mrs. Lawrence Lewis, Abby Scott Baker, Anita Pollitzer, Alice Paul, Florence Boeckel, Mabel Vernon (standing, right)

Helena Hill Weed, Norwalk, Conn. Serving three-day sentence in D.C. prison for carrying banner, 'Governments derive their just powers from the consent of the governed.'

Please, if you are so inclined, pass this on to all the women you know. And men, too. We all need to get out and vote and use this right that was fought so hard for by these very courageous women. Whether you vote democratic, republican or an independent party – remember to vote.


For a U.S. Library of Congress listing of these and other suffrage prisoners, click here.


Note: The original author of this article on women's right to vote is Pulitzer Prize- winning columnist Connie Schultz. She is married to U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown. For her regular column, click here. The essay has been edited for clarity. To check the veracity of the article's contents, click here. Ms. Schultz wrote this article after viewing a powerful documentary on the women's right to vote movement titled Iron Jawed Angels, which is available here.

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The Women’s Rights Movement, 1848–1920

The beginning of the fight for women’s suffrage in the United States, which predates Jeannette Rankin’s entry into Congress by nearly 70 years, grew out of a larger women’s rights movement. That reform effort evolved during the 19th century, initially emphasizing a broad spectrum of goals before focusing solely on securing the franchise for women. Women’s suffrage leaders, moreover, often disagreed about the tactics and whether to prioritize federal or state reforms. Ultimately, the suffrage movement provided political training for some of the early women pioneers in Congress, but its internal divisions foreshadowed the persistent disagreements among women in Congress and among women’s rights activists after the passage of the 19th Amendment.

/tiles/non-collection/W/WIC_Essay1_3_National_Woman's_Party_LC.xmlImage courtesy of the Library of CongressAlice Paul (second from left), chairwoman of the National Woman’s Party, and officers of the group in front of their Washington headquarters, circa 1920s. They are holding a banner emblazoned with a quote from suffragist Susan B. Anthony: “No self-respecting woman should wish or work for the success of a party that ignores her sex.”
The first gathering devoted to women’s rights in the United States was held July 19–20, 1848, in Seneca Falls, New York. The principal organizers of the Seneca Falls Convention were Elizabeth Cady Stanton, a mother of four from upstate New York, and the Quaker abolitionist Lucretia Mott.1 About 100 people attended the convention; two-thirds were women. Stanton drafted a “Declaration of Sentiments, Grievances, and Resolutions” that echoed the preamble of the Declaration of Independence: “We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men and women are created equal.” Among the 13 resolutions set forth in Stanton’s “Declaration” was the goal of achieving the “sacred right of franchise.”2

The sometimes-fractious suffrage movement that grew out of the Seneca Falls meeting proceeded in successive waves. Initially, women reformers addressed social and institutional barriers that limited women’s rights, including family responsibilities, a lack of educational and economic opportunities, and the absence of a voice in political debates. Stanton and Susan B. Anthony, a Massachusetts teacher, met in 1850 and forged a lifetime alliance as women’s rights activists. Like many other women reformers of the era, they both had been active in the abolitionist movement. For much of the 1850s they agitated against the denial of basic economic freedoms to women. Later they unsuccessfully lobbied Congress to include women in the provisions of the 14th and 15th Amendments (extending citizenship rights and granting voting rights to African-American men, respectively).

/tiles/non-collection/W/WIC_Essay1_4_Suffrage_Cartoon_LC.xmlImage courtesy of the Library of CongressThe cover for the official program for the March 3, 1913, National American Woman Suffrage Association’s procession in Washington, D.C., features a woman seated on a horse and blowing a long horn, from which is draped a “votes for women” banner. The U.S. Capitol is in background.
In the wake of the Civil War, however, reformers sought to avoid marginalization as “social issues” zealots by focusing their message exclusively on the right to vote.3 In 1869 two distinct factions of the suffrage movement emerged. Stanton and Anthony created the National Woman Suffrage Association (NWSA), which directed its efforts toward changing federal law and opposed the 15th Amendment on the basis that it excluded women. Lucy Stone, a one-time Massachusetts antislavery advocate and a prominent lobbyist for women’s rights, formed the American Woman Suffrage Association (AWSA).4 Leaders of the AWSA rejected the NWSA’s agenda as racially divisive and organized with the aim to continue a national reform effort at the state level. Although California Senator Aaron Sargent introduced in Congress a women’s suffrage amendment in 1878, the overall campaign stalled. Eventually, the NWSA also shifted its efforts to the individual states where reformers hoped to start a ripple effect to win voting rights at the federal level.
/tiles/non-collection/W/WIC_Essay1_5_Suffrage_Parade_LC.xmlImage courtesy of the Library of CongressSuffragists parade in New York City in 1916 with a banner that reads “President Wilson favors votes for women.” Woodrow Wilson, a reluctant convert to the cause, eventually supported the 19th Amendment, which first passed the House in 1918 and was ratified by the states in 1920.
During the 1880s, the two wings of the women’s rights movement struggled to maintain momentum. The AWSA was better funded and the larger of the two groups, but it had only a regional reach. The NWSA, which was based in New York, relied on its statewide network, but also drew recruits from around the nation largely on the basis of the extensive speaking circuits of Stanton and Anthony. Neither group attracted broad support from women or persuaded male politicians or voters to adopt its cause. For instance, suffrage movement leaders knew that this was a significant impediment to achieving their goal. Susan B. Anthony and Ida H. Harper cowrote, “In the indifference, the inertia, the apathy of women, lies the greatest obstacle to their enfranchisement.” Historian Nancy Woloch described early suffragists’ efforts as “a crusade in political education by women and for women, and for most of its existence, a crusade in search of a constituency.”5

The turning point came in the late 1880s and early 1890s, when the nation experienced a surge of volunteerism among middle-class women—activists in progressive causes, members of women’s clubs and professional societies, temperance advocates, and participants in local civic and charity organizations. The determination of these women to expand their sphere of activities further outside the home helped legitimize the suffrage movement and provided new momentum for the NWSA and the AWSA. By 1890, seeking to capitalize on their newfound “constituency,” the two groups united to form the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA).6 Led initially by Stanton and then by Anthony, the NAWSA began to draw on the support of women activists in organizations as diverse as the Women’s Trade Union League, the Woman’s Christian Temperance Union, and the National Consumers League.

/tiles/non-collection/W/WIC_Essay1_6_Feltondesk_LC.xmlImage courtesy of the Library of CongressRebecca Latimer Felton of Georgia, the first woman to serve in the U.S. Senate, poses at her desk in the Senate Office Building. Felton’s appointment to an unexpired term in 1922 lasted a single day.
For the next two decades the NAWSA worked as a nonpartisan organization focused on gaining the vote in states, although managerial problems and a lack of coordination initially limited its success. The first state to grant women complete voting rights was Wyoming in 1869. Three other western states—Colorado (1893), Utah (1896), and Idaho (1896)—followed shortly after NAWSA was founded. But before 1910 only these four states allowed women to vote. “Why the West first?” remains a contested question. Some scholars suggest that the West proved to be more progressive in extending the vote to women, in part, because there were so few of them on the frontier. Granting women political rights was intended to bring more women westward and to boost the population. Others suggest that women had long played nontraditional roles on the hardscrabble frontier and were accorded a more equal status by men. Still others find that political expediency by territorial officials played a role. They do, however, agree that western women also organized themselves effectively to win the right.7
/tiles/non-collection/W/WIC_Essay1_7_McCormickdesk_HC.xmlCollection of the U.S. House of Representatives
About this objectBefore her House service, Ruth Hanna McCormick was a staunch suffragist who declared to men in her home state of Illinois: “This is our country no less than yours, gentlemen.” She helped pass the Illinois Equal Suffrage Act in 1913, which gave women the vote in municipal and presidential elections.
Between 1910 and 1914, the NAWSA intensified its lobbying efforts and additional states extended the franchise to women: Washington, California, Arizona, Kansas, and Oregon. In Illinois, future Congresswoman Ruth Hanna McCormick of Illinois helped lead the fight for suffrage as a lobbyist in Springfield when the state legislature granted women the right to vote in 1913. This marked the first such victory for women in a state east of the Mississippi River. A year later Montana granted women the right to vote, thanks in part to the efforts of another future Congresswoman, Jeannette Rankin.

Despite the new momentum, however, some reformers were impatient with the pace of change. In 1913 Alice Paul, a young Quaker activist who had experience in the English suffrage movement, formed the rival Congressional Union, later named the National Woman’s Party.8 Paul’s group freely adopted the more militant tactics of its English counterparts, picketing and conducting mass rallies and marches to raise public awareness and support. Embracing a more confrontational style, Paul drew a younger generation of women to her movement, helped resuscitate the push for a federal equal rights amendment, and relentlessly attacked the Democratic administration of President Woodrow Wilson for obstructing the extension of the vote to women.

/tiles/non-collection/W/WIC_Essay1_8_WCTUPetitionforWomanSuffrage_NARA.xmlImage courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration
About this recordThe Women’s Christian Temperance Union was one of the most influential women’s movements at the turn of the 20th century. In 1886 the Nebraska WCTU urged Congress to pass a proposed constitutional amendment that “prohibited disenfranchisement on the basis of sex.”
In 1915 Carrie Chapman Catt, a veteran suffragist since the mid-1880s and a former president of the NAWSA, again secured the organization’s top leadership post. Catt proved to be an adept administrator and organizer whose “Winning Plan” strategy called for disciplined and relentless efforts to achieve state referenda on the vote, especially in nonwestern states.9 Key victories—the first in the South and East—followed in 1917, when Arkansas and New York granted partial and full voting rights, respectively. Beginning in 1917, President Wilson (a convert to the suffrage cause) urged Congress to pass a voting rights amendment. Another crowning achievement also was reached that year when Montana’s Jeannette Rankin was sworn into the 65th Congress (1917–1919) on April 2. Elected two years after her state enfranchised women, Rankin became the first woman to serve in the national legislature.
/tiles/non-collection/W/WIC_Essay1_9_Mott_Anthony_Stanton_AOC.xmlImage courtesy of the Architect of the CapitolSculptor Adelaide Johnson’s Portrait Monument honors three of the suffrage movement’s leaders: Lucretia Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Susan B. Anthony. Unveiled in 1921, the monument is featured prominently in the Rotunda of the U.S. Capitol.
Catt’s steady strategy of securing voting rights state by state and Paul’s vocal and partisan protest campaign coincided with the Wilson administration’s decision to intervene in the First World War, a development that provided compelling rhetoric and a measure of expediency for granting the vote.10 The NAWSA publicly embraced the war cause despite the fact that many women suffragists, including Rankin, were pacifists. Suffrage leaders embraced President Wilson’s powerful argument for intervening in the war to bolster their own case: the effort to “make the world safe for democracy” ought to begin at home by extending the franchise. Moreover, they insisted, the failure to extend the vote to women might impede their participation in the war effort just when they were most needed to play a greater role as workers and volunteers outside the home. Responding to these overtures, the House of Representatives initially passed a voting rights amendment on January 10, 1918, but the Senate did not follow suit before the end of the 65th Congress. It was not until after the war, however, that the measure finally cleared Congress with the House again voting its approval by a wide margin on May 21, 1919, and the Senate concurring on June 14, 1919. A year later, on August 26, 1920, the 19th Amendment, providing full voting rights for women nationally, was ratified when Tennessee became the 36th state to approve it.

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