Math Critical Thinking Questions



Welcome to Education World's Work Sheet Library. In this section of our library, we present more than 100 ready-to-print student work sheets organized by grade level. Click on a grade level folder below to find a library of work sheets that you can use with your students to build a wide variety of critical thinking skills. All the work sheets in this library were provided to Education World by our partners at CriticalThinking.com. Click on the small banner advertisement above for a complete catalog of CriticalThinking.com teacher-ready activities.)

 

 


Visit Education World's Work Sheet Library for a wide variety of free printables for use across the curriculum and across the grades.

Geometry
Students will love this analytical sheet. (Grafes 6-8)

Mathmatical Reasoning
Taky your expectations to the next level. (Grades 6-8)

Balance Benders
Given certain facts, which objects weight will even off the scales? (Grades 6-8)

Balance Benders (#2)
Given certain facts, which objects weight will even off the scales? (Grades 6-8)

Matching Figures: Figural Similarities
Among four similar figures, which two are exactly alike? (Grades 6-8)

Verbal Similarities and Differences: Antonyms
Which of the three words means the opposite of the first word in the line? (Grades 6-8)

Oh, Fur Goodness Sake!
Read the true story. Then make an inference based on the evidence in the story. (Grades 6-8)

Obie One, Obie Two
Read the true story. Then make an inference based on the evidence in the story. (Grades 6-8)

Quit That Rockin
Read the true story. Then make an inference based on the evidence in the story. (Grades 6-8)

Do Size, Shape, or Weight Make a Difference?
High density objects fall at about the same rate of speed regardless of size, shape, or weight. (Grades 6-8)

Rhyme and Reason (#1)
Can you figure out the subjects of these simple rhymes? (Grades 6-8)

Rhyme and Reason (#2)
Can you figure out the subjects of these simple rhymes? (Grades 6-8)

Rhyme and Reason (#3)
Can you figure out the subjects of these simple rhymes? (Grades 6-8)

Uses of Peanut Oil
Find the 10 errors in this brief article. (Grades 6-8)

The Missing Cookie Caper
Find the 10 errors in this brief article. (Grades 6-8)

Temperature Tale of Two Cities
Study the temperature graph. Use it to fill out the temperature charts. (Grades 6-8)

The Roberts Family Reunion
Be a math detective: use clues in the story to answer the questions. (Grades 6-8)

The Amazing Mayans
The story and diagrams help you learn about a Mayan number system. (Grades 6-8)

Who Works Where?
Use the clues to match each womans name with her kind of work. (Grades 6-8)

Married People
Use the clues to figure out what last name goes with each persons first name. (Grades 6-8)

Ice Cream
Use the clues to figure out each persons favorite flavor. (Grades 6-8)

Picnic in the Park
Use the clues to figure out the peoples full names and what they brought to eat. (Grades 6-8)

Alls Fair in Science
Use the information to figure out which science fair project each kid did. (Grades 6-8)

Unusual Animals
Use the clues to figure out what makes these animals unique. (Grades 6-8)

Career Women
Use the clues to figure out each womans job and her income. (Grades 6-8)

Novel Thinking: Charlie and the Chocolate Factory
Use the vocabulary words to complete the crossword puzzle. (Grades 6-8)

Novel Thinking: Charlottes Web
Draw a line from each important event to the detail that tells more about it. (Grades 6-8)

Novel Thinking: Georges Marvelous Medicine
Use the clue to help you unscramble each vocabulary word. (Grades 6-8)

Novel Thinking: Shiloh
Use the vocabulary words and definitions to help you fill in the puzzle. (Grades 6-8)

Novel Thinking: In Their Own Words: Abraham Lincoln
Write a vocabulary word and its part of speech next to each definition. (Grades 6-8)

Defining Geometry
Use evidence presented in the passage to answer each of the questions. (Grades 6-8)

Galileos Vision
Use evidence presented in the passage to answer each of the questions. (Grades 6-8)

Foods as Medicine
Use evidence presented in the passage to answer each of the questions. (Grades 6-8)

Invertebrates
Use information in the story to answer the questions and complete the diagrams. (Grades 6-8)

Earth Materials and Their Uses
Use information in the story to answer the questions and complete the flow chart. (Grades 6-8)

Algebra, Exponents, and Using Formulas
Figure out which number or letter should replace each of the question marks. (Grades 6-8)

Think Quick!
Three fun math challenges from Dr. Funster. (Grades 6-8)

Matrix Fill-Up
Fill in each box with a word that begins with the letter indicated and belongs under the heading. (Grades 6-8)

Skating Party
Use the clues to enter the correct digits in the puzzle. (Grades 6-8)

Table Logic
Use the clues to write the name of each person at the place he or she is seated. (Grades 6-8)

Root Words: geo and More
Use the word root chart to help you match each words to its meaning. (Grades 6-8)

Word Meaning Worksheet
Use what you know about word roots -- or your dictionary -- to complete this matching activity. (Grades 6-8)

Education World®
Copyright © 2010 Education World

 

By Donna Wall
Assistant Professor, Mathematics at American Public University

In College Algebra, we include mixture problems, distance problems, interest rate problems, work problems, wind and air speed problems, etc. We provide math problems with a variety of options so that the students learn how to pick the best problem-solving option. One can reasonably argue that we are teaching thinking skills since a student would need to know when to use which equation and how to apply the variables to the equation.

Maybe we can learn something from the early 1900s about critical thinking. My grandfather understood this concept. He was born in 1896 and lived during a time when the teacher presented a problem to the class and the class would try to figure out how to solve it. As a result, he became an expert in critical thinking. He surprised us at age 85 by acing the GED so he could enroll in a college course after he was not able to track down his high school diploma.

Can we learn from the past? What if students were presented with a problem or problems in a forum, were given time to brainstorm, and later were given tools to solve the problem? Would it help with critical thinking skills and challenge them?

One scenario that comes to mind is the problem that was originally coined by the popular TV game show ”Let’s Make a Deal” and is a classic example of critical thinking. In the show, three doors are presented to contestants with a prize behind only one of the doors. If the contestant choses “door #1” but then “door #2” is opened showing no prize, is it better to stay with the original chosen door, or go with what is behind “door #3?”

If switching to “door #3” is the correct way to go, one must assume that the contestant must always have a second chance and a door is always revealed. What makes that statement true? Can you think of how you could apply this concept to a similar problem?

Do you think problems like this would make successful discussion questions? Why or why not?

About the Author

Donna Wall is an assistant professor with American Public University where she currently teaches College Algebra, Trigonometry, Contemporary Math, Statistics, Discrete Math, and Math Modeling. She received her BS degree in mathematics and MSIS degree with a concentration in mathematics from the University of Texas at Tyler. She has done some postgraduate work at Trident University. Originally she worked as a mathematician and programmer for Teledyne Geotech but now enjoys teaching and writing courses. Over the last 10 years she has written more than 15 courses in research, statistics, and mathematics.

Comments

comments

Tags: challenging students, critical thinking, math, promoting critical thinking

One thought on “Math Critical Thinking Questions

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *